WordMothers

Desk and laptop of writer Julie Trimingham

Interview by Nicole Melanson

HOW DID YOU GET STARTED?

A red plastic typewriter was given to me when I was four.

WHAT IS YOUR LATEST BOOK OR CURRENT PROJECT?

Way Elsewhere, a collection of fictional essays will be coming out soon from Lettered Streets Press. I’ve had fun performing at The Moth, events where people tell short, true, first-person stories. And I write for Numéro Cinq, an online magazine, which is great fun. I’m currently drafting my second novel.

WHO OR WHAT INSPIRES YOU?

I am trying to understand some things about people. How to find the love in any situation, or the hurt, the humor, the humanity.

 WHO WOULD YOU LIKE TO HEAR MORE FROM?

I’d like to hear a gorgeous cacophony of voices that have not always been heard widely. There’s room for everyone. We need everyone. There are so many ways of being a person, there are so many ways of telling a story. Women of color, indigenous women, women in poverty, women in abusive relationships, women in cultures where being a woman is not encouraged: these women have voices and important stories.

 Read more at http://wordmothers.com/2015/04/29/interview-with-author-julie-trimingham/

Northwest Book Lovers

Northwest Book Lovers

Julie Trimingham Listens to the “Mockingbird” Song

AN INTERVIEW BY LINDSEY MCGUIRK

Mockingbird is Julie Trimingham’s debut novel. Rich with the sights, sounds, and smells of Cuba, the novel is told through the eyes of Mia, an unemployed actress tagging along with her lackluster boyfriend as he desperately works to finish his book. Her days are spent ambling through the neighborhoods with a mix of thrill and tedium. While out one day, Mia happens upon an abandoned baby in a car, which she feels more connected to than anything that she has in ages. That connection that leads her to questionable decisions as her drive to keep the child strengthens. The visuals Trimingham paints are no doubt the result of her filmmaking career, where her eye for detail is evident. We wanted to find out more about Mockingbird, Trimingham’s filmmaking, and what drew her to Cuba.

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